Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3

By Cassiodorus; P. G. Walsh | Go to book overview

the things which were said, and prefers to be Christ's poor man rather than a leader of heretics, choosing to beat on the door of the heavenly King rather than to teach harmful doctrines." He who will be able so to choose and to judge will receive then the mercies of the Lord, which cannot be ended at any time.


Conclusion Drawn From the Psalm

Though all the verses of this psalm are recounted with sweet proclamation, my spirit is especially touched with delight by the passage which says that God's Church is to be united from all parts of the world in brief compass. It says: He gathered them out of the countries, from the rising and the setting of the sun, from the north and from the sea. 24 But it is worthwhile to scrutinise this verse rather more carefully, for it is an excellent pointer to astronomical teaching. By speaking of the four hinges of the universe, he has sketched the world in quadrangular shape. I have found that this psalm is divided up by the most learned father Augustine. 25 He relates that he has explained it to the people, and so he did not think that it was accordingly necessary to interpret it. I have imitated this practice so far as I could, thinking that all the psalms should be split by allotting divisions to them, and reckoning that the indications provided by the authority of this great Father provide no minor consolations to our explanations.


COMMENTARY ON PSALM 107

I. A psalm-canticle ofDavid. We observe in this psalm a new feature for scrutiny; it is clear that it is composed of parts of Psalms 56 and 59. 1 But though the words themselves are written as in those earlier psalms, they are aimed at a different sense, for the heading which is always designed to indicate the content of a psalm is different, and it persuades us that those sections earlier set down are understood here in another sense. We have often observed that canticle is relevant to the contemplation of divine matters, whereas psalm refers to activities, as long as they are seen to harmonise with the divine commands.

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