Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3

By Cassiodorus; P. G. Walsh | Go to book overview
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doning present joys and loving melancholy more? Look at me; I hold what I see. Go on hoping for what you groundlessly prefer to suspect will come to pass." Next comes: And contempt to the proud. The proud despise the humble when they hear from them proclamations such as they scorn to obey. Since they love the things of the present, they have no truck with the future, and through their debased wickedness they attack more sharply those who strive to comply with the Lord's commands. But at the judgment to come they experience the contrary conversion. The proud who have plenty become objects of reproach and contempt. Solomon says of such people: What has pride profited us? Or what has the boasting of riches conferred on us?, 12 and what follows. We should clearly realise that the sequence of normal eloquence demanded that he say: "Our soul is greatly filled with the reproach of the rich and the contempt of the proud;" but since he said instead: Our soul is greatly filled: a reproach to the rich and contempt to the proud, this seems a peculiarity of divine Scripture. It is not to be regarded as a solecism, but as an utterance not as yet grasped by human conventions.


Conclusion Drawn From the Psalm

The prophet has by now mounted four steps, and he rightly bore with the jealousy of lunatics, for success always afflicts opponents since they imagine that one known to be zealous for his soul's progress is being impeded by their empty allegations. Let us look closely at him, remarkable as he is in perseverance in prayer, never slackening through any expressions of contempt. He heals his various afflictions and wounds by the one specific: he always lifts up his eyes to the Lord.


COMMENTARY ON PSALM 123

A canticle ofsteps. The prophet attests that one person in many and many persons in one mount these steps, since he clearly speaks in both singular and plural voices in these psalms. There is nothing wrong with this, for God's people form the one body of Christ, and again we know that the devoted folk resolve themselves into each and every

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