Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3

By Cassiodorus; P. G. Walsh | Go to book overview

dispute with unity and are seen to be hostile to the Catholic people will not have this peace in any sense.


Conclusion Drawn From the Psalm

Let us consider how admirably firm this step is, enabling the prophet to recall his past ills, and to say that the Lord has lent aid during all of them. He prepares his ascent to better things, for he knows that the Lord's help has been at hand in the past. He would not have been able to mount higher if he had sought to presume on his own powers. So let us embrace this saving canon with all the feeling of our hearts, so that He who has caused us to hear of His great deeds may allow us to mount these steps.


COMMENTARY ON PSALM 125

A canticle of steps. After their enslavement to all sins, how sweetly do the voices of the blessed project themselves as they mount to the heavenly Jerusalem, so that poised on that lofty route they may comfort themselves with sacred song! Their journey is most happy, and their toil fruitful, provided that He who is the goal of their journey is always kept in their hearts. So let us lend our soul's ear and concentrate most unsullied minds, for if we drink in the holy hymn within our hearts' depths, we capture something of that blessedness.


Division of the Psalm

These most holy men who have been freed by divine pity give thanks in the first section of the psalm because they have been offered the refuge of such outstanding favour from the most savage subjection of sins, and so are found worthy of praise among the nations. In the second part they pray that their captivity may be transformed into joy,

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