Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3

By Cassiodorus; P. G. Walsh | Go to book overview

prophecy but the very fruit of the womb; so it may be clear beyond doubt to all that indications of the New and Old Testaments, designated by the decades of the whole work, are contained in Psalm 71, and that here the same indications are revealed by the individual psalm-numbers. 14


COMMENTARY ON PSALM 126

A canticle of the steps of Solomon. We have said that it is not otiose that the name of Solomon, which means in Latin pacificus (peace‐ maker), 1 is added to this heading. Whom could this epithet more appropriately fit than Him who drew together the circumcised and the uncircumcised in the cause of unity, and as the Corner-stone steadied with solid strength the walls attached to Him from different angles? Of Him Paul says: For he is our peace, who hath made both one. 2 There is also the fact that this is the eighth step counting from the back, and the number eight has reference to the Lord Christ's resurrection, the subject on which it is to concentrate. It denotes the New Testament to which these prophetic mysteries are addressed. Note that here and in Psalm 71 the name of Solomon is clearly inscribed to make the separation between the Testaments, so that you may realise that both Old and New are in harmony with each other.


Division of the Psalm

The prophet was exultant because he was filled with the holy Spirit, and had forseen the grace of the New Testament. To ensure that destructive presumption should not creep up on himself or on others because of this great gift, at the outset he teaches the most holy people that no-one should strive to attribute anything good to his own strength, since all things lie within the divine power. Nor should anyone seek to anticipate the time which he knows has been ordained by the Lord's decree. In the second sequence he speaks of the Lord Jesus Christ and His apostles, or of any persons who perform His commands.

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