Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms - Vol. 3

By Cassiodorus; P. G. Walsh | Go to book overview

linger in this world. The blessed are said to pass through the world like travellers, for they have no interest in its delights.


Conclusion Drawn From the Psalm

Dearest brothers, we are aware of the nature of the danger if we speak without circumspection. We know how much we ought to fear what the most holy prophet fears. When does our tongue not stealthily entice us into empty speech, or inspire us with longing for falsehood ? It is the tongue which often induces us towards vices, which we can overcome with complete safety only by the single means of devoting it at all times to the Lord's praises. Let it ever speak the words in which it cannot err, let it perform the work which will benefit the soul, let it minister reverently to the Creator. We set a guard upon our mouth if we ponder diligently the Lord's commands. The person who refuses to leave the good unspoken says nothing which is evil; no error can steal in where heavenly truth overflows. If evil thoughts are withdrawn from us, if most foul deeds are set aside, if we isolate ourselves from intercourse with the wicked, then in the prophet's words we shall become alone for the Lord, since we are wholly uninvolved in most wicked designs.


COMMENTARY ON PSALM 141

I. The understanding of David: a prayer when he was in the cave. The theme of the psalm is contained in this heading, but an apposite indication of a spiritual meaning is revealed to us through physical parallels. David, the son of Jesse, fled from the prince Saul, and when he lay hidden in a cave he uttered a prayer 1 which he revealed that the Lord Christ would make in the flesh before His passion. When understanding prefaces this prayer, the comparison is shown to refer to Him who avoided His persecutors as He prayed and hid himself by moving to various places. This was so that the Son of God could fulfil the prom

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