Gender, Emotion, and the Family

By Leslie Brody | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many friends, colleagues, and family members helped to inspire this book and to make it a reality, especially in the face of the multiple (and often overwhelming) demands faced by an employed mother. I am immensely grateful to all of them. When I started the book, I had two‐ year-old twins, Rachel and Matthew, and a six-year-old, Jennie. They are now thriving at the respective ages of six and ten. I especially thank them and my husband, Lance, for sharing me with my work, and for their ability to make this book another member of the family. Special appreciation goes to Lance for taking the time to read drafts of my chapters and to provide me with thoughtful feedback, integrating my work into his own busy schedule.

Over the past twenty years, the Psychology Department at Boston University has encouraged me to explore the research that matters the most to me. Many colleagues at Boston University have enriched my thinking about gender and emotion. I especially thank Anne Copeland for her many years of research collaboration and friendship. Fran Grossman and Abby Stewart (now at the University of Michigan) have both been sources of wisdom and support. Bob Harrison helpfully provided his expertise on research methodology and emotion on innumerable occasions. The late Bill Mackavey, former chair of the department, and Henry Marcucella, the current chair, were particularly supportive of my work.

I am grateful to colleagues, both at Boston University and elsewhere, who read parts of the book and provided helpful feedback, including Lisa Feldman Barrett, Michael Baum, Murray Cohen, Alice Cronin-Golomb, Judith Hall, Jackie Liederman, Gretchen Lovas, Kim Saudino, and Abby Stewart. Elizabeth Aries' review of the book in its entirety was thoughtful and insightful. I also thank the many graduate students who dedicated their time, energy, and creativity to research issues related to gender and emotion, including Carrie Beckstein, Susan Doron, Shari Friedkin,

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