Ethnicity, Law, and Human Rights: The English Experience

By Sebastian Poulter | Go to book overview

10
Conclusions

In 1978 UNESCO expressed its confidence both in the intrinsic worth of the different cultures found throughout the world and in their potential for fruitful interaction, when it declared its conviction that—

... all peoples and all human groups, whatever their composition or ethnic origin, contribute according to their own genius to the progress of the civilizations and cultures which, in their plurality and as a result of their interpenetration, constitute the common heritage of mankind. 1

The Sri Lankan jurist H. L. De Silva has also extolled the capacity of distinctive ethnic cultures to unify disparate groups of people and give them a special sense of community and identity through a common language and religion—

Ethnic divisions are an integral part of human existence and have by their very diversity and uniqueness contributed richly to the sum total of man's happiness. They symbolise the glories of human civilization and are therefore worthy of preservation for the future. 2

However, coming from a country which has in recent years witnessed terrible ethnic strife, he freely acknowledged the ambivalence of ethnic divisions within a single state and their disturbing ability to impede the growth of that unity of outlook and vision which is so vital to cope with modern problems, adding—

The tensions which are produced by such differences and the prejudices which are engendered by ethnic differences are a great obstacle to progress and a colossal waste in terms of human effort and available resources. 3

It is clear that England has become a much more ethnically diverse society since 1945 and officially a general policy of cultural pluralism (within limits) has been adopted since 1966, in order to pursue the twin objectives of equal opportunity and cultural diversity within a tolerant social atmosphere. However, the creation of a democratic pluralist society which is 'both socially cohesive and culturally diverse', 4 based on shared core values, is by no means easy to accomplish. Rex has

____________________
1
UNESCO Declaration on Race and Racial Prejudice, 27 Nov 1978, preamble.
2
'Pluralism and the Judiciary in Sri Lanka' in Tiruchelvam, N. and Coomaraswamy, R., (eds) The Role of the Judiciary in Plural Societies (London, 1987), 3.
3
Ibid, 2.
4
See 'Education for All' (Swann Committee Report), Cmnd 9453 of 1985, 6.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnicity, Law, and Human Rights: The English Experience
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 418

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.