Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

On Genesis: Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees; And, on the Literal Interpretation of Genesis, An Unfinished Book

By Saint Augustine; Roland J. S. J. Teske | Go to book overview

that this whole work belongs to the day and that after this work, as if the day were finished, evening came. Because the night belongs to its day as well, one day is not said to have passed until the night has also passed when morning has come. Thus the remaining days are calculated from morning to morning. For now, when morning has come and one day has passed, there begins the work that follows upon the morning that has come, and after that work there comes evening and then morning and another day passes. In this way the rest of the days pass from then on.


CHAPTER 11

How the Waters Are Divided by the Firmament: Verses Six to Eight

17. "And God said, 'Let there be the firmament in the middle of the water, and let there be a division between the waters.' So it was done. And God made the firmament, and God divided the water that is above the firmament from the water that is below the firmament, and God called the firmament heaven, and God saw that it was good." 56. I do not recall that the Manichees are accustomed to find fault with this. The waters were divided so that some were above the firmament and others below the firmament. Since we said that matter was called water, I believe that the firmament of heaven separated the corporeal matter of visible things from the incorporeal matter of invisible things. 57. For though heaven is a very beautiful body, every invisible creature sur‐

____________________
56.
Gen 1.6-8.
57.
Though Augustine cannot recall any Manichaean objections to this verse, he cannot resist saying something about the waters above and below the firmament, that is, about incorporeal and corporeal matter. For Augustine there is matter in everything but God, for it is the principle of mutability, and God alone is absolutely immutable; cf. C 12.6.6. For an excellent account of Augustine's view of matter, cf. Solignac's note on C 12.3.3-6.6 in BA 14.599-603. Augustine derived the doctrine of spiritual and corporeal matter from Plotinus; cf. Enneads 1.8.9; 2.4.8; 2.7.2; 6.9.7. Cf. also A. H. Armstrong, "Spiritual and Intelligible Matter in Plotinus and Augustine," AM 1.276-283. It is only the few that understand how invisible waters surpass this sky; the little ones presumably have to believe until they can understand.

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On Genesis: Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees; And, on the Literal Interpretation of Genesis, An Unfinished Book
Table of contents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 198

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.