On Genesis: Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees; And, on the Literal Interpretation of Genesis, An Unfinished Book

By Saint Augustine; Roland J. S. J. Teske | Go to book overview
Save to active project

those caught in carnal desires, who are glad to hear that it is not they themselves who do whatever they do in their wantonness, but the nation of darkness. They deceive also the curious who are wise about the things of earth and search out spiritual things with an earthy eye. 185. There will, however, be enmities between it and the woman, and between its seed and the woman's if she bears children with pain and turns to her husband so that he may rule over her. 186. For then one can know that one part of us does not belong to God as its author and another to the nation of darkness, as these men say. Rather the part that has the power of ruling in man and that lower part that should be ruled are both from God. Thus the Apostle says, "A man certainly should not cover his head, since he is the image and glory of God, but a woman is the glory of man. For the man is not from the woman, but the woman is from the man. For man was not created on account of the woman, but the woman on account of the man. For that reason a woman ought to have a veil over her head, on account of the angels. Nonetheless, woman is not without man, and man is not without woman in the Lord. For as the woman is from the man, so the man is through the woman, but all things are from God." 187.


CHAPTER 27

Adam's Fall and Punishment Taken Allegorically

41. Let Adam now labor in his field and let him understand that the fact that the earth bears thorns and thistles is not due to nature, but to punishment. Let him not attribute this to some nation of darkness or other, but to the judgment of God, because the directive of justice is to give to each his due. 188.

____________________
185.
Cf. above, 1.23.40 for Augustine's triad of sins.
186.
Cf. Gen 3.16.
187.
1 Cor 11.7-12.
188.
The directive of justice as "giving to each his due" is found in Cicero, De officiis 1.15. One of Augustine's principal concerns throughout the anti‐ Manichaean writings is the defense of God's justice. Hence, he has to portray the "thorns and thistles" of this life as just penalties. Cf. DLA 3.23.66-68 for

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On Genesis: Two Books on Genesis against the Manichees; And, on the Literal Interpretation of Genesis, An Unfinished Book
Table of contents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 198

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?