The Role of Transportation in the Industrial Revolution: A Comparison of England and France

By Rick Szostak | Go to book overview

Preface

It is humbling to recognize the crucial role played by others in the completion of this book. This work began as a doctoral thesis at Northwestern University. Joel Mokyr supervised the thesis, was generous with his advice, and was very supportive of a project which was quite different in orientation and methodology from his own research. I cannot thank him enough. Jonathan R.T Hughes, Charlie Calomiris, and Gerald Goldstein also served on my dissertation committee, and contributed much in the way of advice and encouragement. Lou Cain, John Lyons, and Cormac O'Grada made a number of helpful suggestions. Last but not least, I owe a debt of gratitude to my fellow graduate students. Without such friends, this project would never have been completed.

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada provided me with funding which allowed me to undertake several months of research in England and France, and to complete the final draft of the book. Over the last couple of years, along with the continued interest of Joel Mokyr in the project, I have benefitted from the comments of George Grantham and Michael B. Percy. Cheryle Ann Kaplan provided much-appreciated research assistance. The two anonymous referees both provided thoughtful and helpful criticism. Peter Blaney of McGill-Queen's has been a pleasure to deal with. Claire Gigantes did a masterful job of editing the manuscript. Charlene Hill typed most of the manuscript with her usual skill and speed. Maryon Buffel and Pat Gangur completed the task admirably.

I thank Elsevier Science Publishers for permission to use material previously published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.

I end on a personal note. I was blessed with parents who never tried to push me in any direction but were always there to support me in whatever I chose to do. This book is for them.

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