Communism in Czechoslovakia, 1948-1960

By Edward Taborsky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
THE CONSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK

TWO CONSTITUTIONS were enacted by the communist regime of Czechoslovakia within the period covered in the present volume: the Ninth-of-May Constitution of 1948 and the new Soviet-type Constitution of 1960. The constitutions of communist-dominated countries are, of course, anything but binding fundamental laws in the Western sense. Nevertheless, the difference between the two documents symbolizes well the extent to which Czechoslovakia's political institutions have been sovietized in the course of the twelve years that separate the Ninth-of-May Constitution from its 1960 successor.


CONSTITUTIONALISM--COMMUNIST STYLE

Whenever constitutions of dictatorial systems are considered, especially those of totalitarian communism, the student invariably is forced to ask why the rulers care to have any written constitution at all. Their power is absolute. All decisions of any importance are made within the supreme Party conclave and its underlings are in control of everything in every part of the country and in every segment of life. Why, then, do they bother with the formality of a fundamental law? Why do they insist on limiting their own powers, even though only nominally, by elaborate systems of constitutional prescriptions and restrictions that are protected legally--as in non-communist constitutions--against easy amendment?

The reasons underlying the Czechoslovak communist philosophy of constitutionalism are much the same as in the Soviet Union and in other people's democracies. It is one of the basic maxims of Marxist-Leninist teaching on the relations between the Party and the State that the Party makes policy, that it guides and controls but does not directly carry out its decisions.1 For that purpose the Party maintains a machinery of government separate from the Party apparatus

____________________
1
"Vsesoiuznaia Kommunisticheskaia Partia (b) v rezoliutsiakh i resheniakh s'ezdov, konferentsii i plenumov Ts. K. 1898-1935" (The All-Union Communist Party [B] in Resolutions and Decisions of the Congresses, Conferences, and Plenums of the C.C. 1898-1935), Moscow, 1936, 1, pp. 314-315.

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communism in Czechoslovakia, 1948-1960
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.