Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South

By Susanna Delfino; Michele Gillespie | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Louis-Phillipe, Diary of My Travels in America, trans. Stephen Becker (New York: Delacorte Press, 1977), 72
2
Mary C. Wright, “Economic Development and Native American Women in the Early Nineteenth Century,” American Quarterly 33 (1981): 525–36; Regina Smith Oboler, Women, Power, and Economic Change (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1985); Theresa Amott and Julie Matthaei, Race, Gender, and Work (Boston: South End Press, 1991); Eirlys M. Barker, “Princesses, Wives, and Wenches: White Perceptions of Southeastern Indian Women to 1770,” in Women and Freedom in Early America, ed. Larry D. Eldridge (New York: New York University Press, 1997, 44–61
3
Jefferson Chapman, Tellico Archaeology (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1985), 33–46; John H. Blitz, Ancient Chiefdoms of the Tombigbee (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1993), 33–39; John A. Walthall, Prehistoric Indians of the Southeast (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1980), chs. 3 and 4; Patty Jo Watson and Mary C. Kennedy, “The Development of Horticulture in the Eastern Woodlands of North America: Women's Role,” in Engendering Archaeology, ed. Joan M. Gero and Margaret W. Conkey (Oxford, U.K.: Basil Blackwell Ltd., 1991), 255–75
4
R. Douglas Hurt, Indian Agriculture in America (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1987), 6–11; Roy Dickens, Cherokee Prehistory (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1976), 13, 94, 209; James B. Grifin, “Comments on the Late Prehistoric Societies in the Southeast,” in Towns and Temples along the Mississippi, ed. David H. Dye and Cheryl A. Cox (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1990), 6–9; Chapman, Tellico, 56–77
5
Theda Perdue, Cherokee Women: Gender and Culture Change, 1700–1835 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1998), 13–15; Choctaw corn myth, folder 42, microfilm reel 2, Henry S. Halbert Papers, Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Jackson, Miss.; “The Origin of Maize (Creek),” in Native American Legends, comp. and ed. George E. Lankford (Little Rock, Ark.: August House, 1987), 155.
6
Daniel Maltz and JoAllyn Archambault, “Gender and Power in Native North America,” in Women and Power in Native North America, ed. Laura F. Klein and Lillian A. Ackerman (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1995), 234
7
Charles Hudson, The Juan Pardo Expeditions (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1990), 66–67; Charles Hudson, Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997), 174–84.
8
Alfred W. Crosby, “Virgin Soil Epidemics as a Factor in the Aboriginal Depopulation in America,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 33 (April 1976): 289–99; Marvin T. Smith, Archaeology of Aboriginal Culture Change in the Interior Southeast (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1987); Vernon James Knight Jr., “The Formation of the Creeks,” in The Forgotten Centuries, ed. Charles Hudson and Carmen Chaves Tesser (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994), 373–92; Patricia Galloway, “Confederacy as a Solution to Chiefdom Dissolution: Historical Evidence in the Choctaw Case,” in ibid., 393–420; Peter H. Wood, “The Changing Population of the Colonial South: An Overview by Race and Region, 1685—

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