Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South

By Susanna Delfino; Michele Gillespie | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Bell Irvin Wiley, The Life of Johnny Reb: The Common Soldier of the Confederacy (1943; reprint, Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1978); Emory M. Thomas, The Confederate State of Richmond: A Biography of the Capital (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1971); Virginius Dabney, Richmond: The Story of a City, rev. ed. (1976; reprint, Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1990); George Rable, Civil Wars: Women and the Crisis of Southern Nationalism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989); Victoria E. Bynum, Unruly Women: The Politics of Social and Sexual Control in the Old South (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992); Drew Gilpin Faust, Mother of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996). James M. McPherson does not discuss the subject in either Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction (New York: Knopf, 1982) or Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), and George Rable's discussion of Richmond prostitutes in Civil Wars (194–95) adds nothing new. Drew Faust makes only two references to prostitution in Mothers of Invention: Benjamin Butler's General Order No. 28 (p. 212) and a discussion between a husband and wife about him visiting “fancy women” while in the army (pp. 124–25).
2
New York women have been the subject of numerous studies; see Marilynn Wood Hill, Their Sisters' Keepers: Prostitution in New York City, 1830–1870 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993); Christine Stansell, City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789–1860 (New York: Knopf, 1986); and Timothy Guilfoyle, City of Eros: New York City Prostitution and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790–1920 (New York: W. W. Norton, 1992). They also occupy a major portion of William W. Sanger's massive study of prostitution, The History of Prostitution (1859; reprint, New York: Arno Press, 1972). Barbara Meil Hobson's study, Uneasy Virtue: The Politics of Prostitution and the American Reform Tradition (1987; reprint, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990), focuses on women in Boston, Massachusetts. Scholarly works on prostitution in the American West include Anne M. Butler, Daughters of Joy, Sisters of Misery: Prostitutes in the American West, 1865–1890 (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1985); Marion S. Goldman, Gold Diggers and Silver Miners: Prostitution and Social Life on the Comstock Lode (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1981); and Jacqueline Baker Barnhart, The Fair but Frail: Prostitution in San Francisco, 1849–1900 (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1986). Popularized accounts of western prostitutes include George Williams III, The Redlight Ladies of Virginia City, Nevada (Riverside, Calif.: Tree by the River Publishing, 1984), and Mary W. Remmers, Going Down the Line: Galveston's Red-Light District Remembered (N.p.: n.p., 1997). Some of the best European studies are Judith R. Walkowitz, Prostitution in Victorian Society: Women, Class, and the State (1980; reprint, Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1983), and Alain Corbin, Women for Hire: Prostitution and Sexuality in France after 1850, trans. Alan Sheridan (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1992).
3
Marilynn Hill's study of prostitution in New York City does address prostitutes' relations with the military, and neither Barnhart's study nor Anne Butler's examination of

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