Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South

By Susanna Delfino; Michele Gillespie | Go to book overview

Contributors

E. SUSAN BARBER completed her Ph.D. at the University of Maryland, College Park. She teaches at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, where she is assistant professor of history and coordinates the women's studies program. She has published several articles on social life in Confederate Richmond.

BESS BEATTY is an associate professor of history at Oregon State University. She has published A Revolution Gone Backward: The Black Response to National Politics, 1876–1896 (1987) and Alamance: The Holt Family and Industralization in a North Carolina County, 1837– 1900 (1999). Her new project has the working title “Traveling Beyond Her Sphere: American Women Tour Europe, 1814–1914.”

EMILY BINGHAM is an independent scholar in Louisville, Kentucky, where she has taught at the University of Louisville and Bellarmine College. She co-edited with Thomas A. Underwood The Southern Agrarians and the New Deal: Essays After I'll Take My Stand (2001). She is currently completing a book about three generations of an assimilating Jewish family in the nineteenth-century United States.

JAMES TAYLOR CARSON is the author of Searching for the Bright Path: The Mississippi Choctaws from Prehistory to Removal (1999) and a number of articles and essays on gender and the Mississippi Choctaws. His essay in this volume is part of an initial endeavor to explore more broadly relations between gender and production across the native South. He teaches history at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

EMILY CLARK is assistant professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi. She holds a Ph.D. in history from Tulane University and is the author of the forthcoming Masterless Mistresses: The New Orleans Ursulines and the Development of a New World Society, 1727–1834. Her articles have appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly and the Historical Journal.

STEPHANIE COLE is assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Arlington. Her book, Servants and Slaves: Domestic Service in Antebellum North/South Border Cities, is forthcoming from the University of Illinois Press. She is currently working on a study of the construction of race in the U.S. Southwest during the Jim Crow era.

SUSANNA DELFINO teaches American history at the University of Genoa, Italy. She has written on the U.S. South, the early Southwest, and the West. Among her major publica

-309-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.