United States Policy towards Indonesia in the Truman and Eisenhower Years

By Andrew Roadnight | Go to book overview
Save to active project

6
From Diplomacy to Armed Intervention (January 1956 May 1958)

Despite the Dulles brothers' concerns, the Administration's realisation of just how little influence it had in Jakarta after the elections forced it to reconsider its policy towards Indonesia. State Department officials concluded that a more positive approach was necessary. In particular, they were worried that Washington's adherence to ‘strict neutrality or strict inactivity’ on all aspects of Dutch–Indonesian relations could end in an ‘explosive anti-Dutch reaction’ which would set back US interests in Indonesia. 1 The Administration also found itself under pressure in the media for its lack of friendliness towards the Sastroamidjojo Government. For example, The New York Times supported criticism of Washington's portrayal of the entire Partai Nasionalis Indonesia (PNI) as fellow-travellers and its failure, thereby, to mobilise nationalism in the struggle against the Partai Komunis Indonesia (PKI). 2 It was in this context that Cumming was recalled, to Washington, in December 1955, to discuss how the Administration might respond to the new situation.


A tactical reassessment

The State Department's main problem was whether or not to invite Sukarno to visit the US. Although there was a need for the Administration to build a relationship with the Indonesian President, the decision was by no means clear-cut. Those who favoured extending an invitation, like Cumming, knew that Sukarno badly wanted to make an official visit to America, a country whose political traditions he claimed had greatly influenced him. They were also aware that the State Department had received intelligence that the USSR and the People's Republic of China (PRC) might be about to issue invitations of their own and wanted to

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
United States Policy towards Indonesia in the Truman and Eisenhower Years
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?