The Struggle for the Pacific

By Gregory Bienstock | Go to book overview

NOTES TO CHAPTER I
1.
"The history of mankind began with a Mediterranean epoch, it continued in the Atlantic period, and now it is entering into the Pacific era."
2.
Bruno Dietrich and Hermann Leiter, Produktion, Verkehr und Handel, in Andree-Heiderich-Sieger, Geographie des Welthandels, Vienna, 1930, vol. 3, p. 383.
3.
Statistisches Jahrbuch für das Deutsche Reich, Berlin, 1934, p. 110.
4
Compiled from the informations given in the Statistical Year Books of the League of Nations, Geneva, 1927, 1928, 1933. The most important and most representative Atlantic and Pacific countries have been chosen. We did not make a comparison with the foreign trade of so representative a country as Holland because in consequence of a complete change in the method of compiling foreign trade statistics, pre-War and post-War Dutch statistics cannot be compared. The post-War foreign trade statistics of France and Germany are equally difficult to compare because of the change of frontier due to the Versailles Treaty. As far as getting a picture of Atlantic trade is concerned they are quite comparable. Ships from every Atlantic country sail to the Pacific, just as ships from every Pacific country sail to the Atlantic. But the foreign trade of the countries bordering on the Atlantic is for the most part done on that ocean, and the same is true of the Pacific countries and that ocean. The position of the United States is rather more complicated, as its coasts are washed by both oceans. Direct information regarding the diversion of the foreign trade of the United States between the two oceans is completely lacking, and so we have to make a rough estimate in the following way:

We have taken the total turnover of the United States ( 1929) to: (1) Pacific Asia ( Eastern Asia, the Philippine islands, and Siam); (2) Oceania ( Australia, New Zealand, and the rest of the Pacific islands); and (3) the countries on the western coast of South America, and taken the total of these three as an approximate figure for the Pacific trade of the United States.

PACIFIC FOREIGN TRADE OF THE UNITED STATES, 1929
(IN MILLION DOLLARS)
(1) Pacific Asia1,251·3
(2) Oceania278·5
(3)The Western Coast of South America232·0
1,761·8

The figures are taken from the Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1933, Washington, 1933.

-95-

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The Struggle for the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Preface 9
  • Contents 13
  • List of Maps 15
  • Chapter I The Pacific World In The Making 17
  • Notes to Chapter I 95
  • Chapter II Rivalries in the Pacific 102
  • Notes to Chapter II 197
  • Chapter III War and Strategy 213
  • Notes to Chapter III 255
  • Epilogue 263
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index of Names 289
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