American Poetry in the Eighteen Nineties: A Study of American Verse, 1890-1899, Based upon the Volumes from That Period Contained in the Harris Collection of American Poetry and Plays in the Brown University Library

By Carlin T. Kindilien | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER I
THE LITERARY SCENE

THE elements in the American literary scene of the Nineties are as varied as the tags critics have tied to the decade: "the twilight interval," "the mauve decade," "the yellow Nineties," "the romantic Nineties," "Howells' age," "the critical period," and, more recently, "the confident years." Too many readers have approached the scene blinded by a thesis sentence: the critic of the sociological novel can find writers who were mindful of deterministic forces; the student of symbolism will find enough evidence to convince him that the French were shaping American poetry by 1895; and the traditionalist will find his conflict between romanticism and realism. The reader who would know this literary scene must deal with all kinds of forces and trends and currents, varying with the section of the country and, again, unrestricted by regional boundaries. American literature of the Nineties is, in one sense, as national as Whitman desired; again there are indications that American artists were almost as receptive to the literary fashions of France, Germany, Italy, and Russia as they had been earlier in the century to England's.

Confronting a paradoxical blending of conventionality and vitality, sterility and energy, most critics of the poetry of the Nineties have been content with a chapter's hurried survey of individuals. The cloak of the genteel seemed to enfold these poets; yet there were choices for men who refused to be covered. Browning Clubs and Tennyson Societies were meeting in 1890 when Stuart Merrill's Pastels in Prose introduced passages of Villiers, Huysmans, Baudelaire, and Mallarméi. The magazine critics were defending the achievement of Clinton Scollard and Will Carleton when Harper's printed Arthur Symons' review of the decadent movement. This literary scene had a place for the neoplatonism of the Harvard poets and the jingoism of the newspaper versifiers; a place for the handsome editions of Thomas Bird Mosher's Portland press and the dime pam

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Poetry in the Eighteen Nineties: A Study of American Verse, 1890-1899, Based upon the Volumes from That Period Contained in the Harris Collection of American Poetry and Plays in the Brown University Library
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.