Developing Countries in the WTO

By Constantine Michalopoulos | Go to book overview

11
Policy Coherence

Introduction

The coherence between trade and other international economic policies and initiatives that affect the development prospects of developing countries has received increased attention since the conclusion of the Uruguay Round agreements (URA). The WTO agreement explicitly calls for collaboration between the new institution and the Bretton Woods institution; that is, the IMF and the World Bank (see Article III of the Agreement Establishing the WTO). After the conclusion of the Agreement the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank engaged in a series of discussions that resulted in formal understandings among the three institutions aimed at ensuring better information flows and stronger collaboration between their management and staff.

But of course the question of policy coherence both antedates the WTO and goes beyond it. There have always been tensions between the trade policies of developed countries at the national level and their efforts to promote development, especially through technical and financial assistance. Their trade policies have been dominated by commercial objectives, frequently narrowly defined. Their assistance policies, on the other hand, have been motivated by a variety of political, developmental and humanitarian as well as commercial and economic objectives. A good example of the latter is the practice of tied aid, which has characterized a significant proportion of the bilateral aid programme of almost all donors.

Questions of coherence at the national level also arise in developing countries, where trade policy implementation, typically by weak Ministries of Trade, sometimes runs counter to overall policy directives formulated by Ministries of Planning or Finance, often in the context of agreements with the IMF and the World Bank. At the same time, at the

-228-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Developing Countries in the WTO
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.