CHAPTER IV.
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE EMPIRE.

IT is only the nineteenth century which has been conscientious in preserving the monuments of the past, but it is also like its predecessors in not fearing to pull down what has been done within a century or two, a system which, when applied for centuries, leaves very little to speak for any. As it frequently happens in our own time, so it was with the Romans. In the days of wealth and power the old buildings were not good enough or large enough to suit the new ideas of the people and were replaced by those whose ruins have partly come down to our time. Some of the walls built by King Servius Tullius and the Etruscan drainage aqueduct and sewer known as the Cloaca Maxima (Fig. 29) are the chief visible remains of the Roman monarchy ( 750-510 B. C.).

The early republic has been equally unfortunate. The first important remains of Roman construction in point of time are some of the aqueduct ruins of the Campagna* dating about 150 B. C.

Meantime, before this date, still farther and more important revolutions, or evolutions, had befallen the Roman state. Mistress of Italy after B. C. 275, her power had become a standing threat to that of the Phenician Carthage which ruled the coasts of North Africa and Eastern Spain, and the islands of Sardinia and Corsica, with much less attention to the well-being of the conquered populations

____________________
*
The wide and now mainly deserted plains which surround the modern city.
The northern Po Valley was not considered a part of Italy till the time of Cæsar, B. C. 50. It was, till then, Cisalpine Gaul ("Gaul this side the Alps").

-63-

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