Public-Private Partnerships: Improving Urban Life

By Perry Davis | Go to book overview

Private-Sector Initiatives in the
Reagan Administration

RENÉE A. BERGER

On 5 October 1981, President Ronald Reagan announced his private‐ sector initiatives strategy. In a speech before the National Alliance of Business (NAB) — a group that had been created during the Johnson administration to increase private-sector involvement in government efforts to reduce unemployment— Reagan outlined a two-part program to establish a special presidential task force and to initiate a comprehensive effort to be undertaken by the cabinet. The President's Task Force on Private Sector Initiatives (hereinafter the Task Force) was to be a blue-ribbon panel composed of thirty-five civic leaders (later increased to forty-four). Its purpose, the president explained, would be "to promote private sector leadership and responsibility for solving public needs, and to recommend ways of fostering greater public-private partnerships. " 1 The directive for the cabinet stipulated that it was to "review agency procedures and regulations and identify barriers to private sector involvement ... [and] develop pump-priming and seed money programs that offer incentives for private sector investment." Furthermore, the cabinet was to "provide technical knowledge to develop private initiatives" and was to examine "existing programs ... to determine which could be more productively carried out by the private sector. " 2

The concept of private-sector initiatives has a long history predating the Reagan program. Over time, the concept has grown more expansive — both in terms of the groups participating (initiatives now encompass youth, senior citizens, and business executives) and the constituencies affected (these now include the poor, the elderly, children, the unemployed, cities in distress, and even new businesses in need of technical assistance). All of Reagan's recent predecessors used conventional policy tools—budget, legislation, organizational structure, and leadership—

____________________
Adapted, with permission, from Renée A. Berger, "Private-Sector Initiatives in the Reagan Era: New Actors Rework an Old Theme," in The Reagan Presidency and the Governing of America, ed. Lester M. Salamon and Michael S. Lund. Copyright 1984 by the Urban Institute.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public-Private Partnerships: Improving Urban Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 161

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.