Public-Private Partnerships: Improving Urban Life

By Perry Davis | Go to book overview

The Role of the University in Public‐
Private Partnerships

RONALD C. KYSIAK

Although public-private partnerships have usually been limited to business and government ventures, there is a variation that can be a powerful tool in meeting new economic-development goals—the university-public-private partnership. This partnership has been effective in some parts of the country in promoting a technologically oriented economic-development program.

Joint university, public-sector, and private-sector initiatives in New Haven, Connecticut, and Evanston, Illinois, have forged unusual yet highly effective alliances between city governments and universities, two institutions with a history of conflict. The enmity that characterizes these relationships was pronounced in New Haven and Evanston because of a basic political conflict over the universities' tax‐ exempt status and the seemingly uncaring attitude of those institutions toward the budgetary and developmental plight of the cities. Yet these fragile coalitions, once built, can be powerful in dealing with the rejuvenation of obsolete economies and depressed business climates.

The benefit of these partnerships is that they strengthen the existing public‐ private partnership, because the university contributes something that neither the business community nor the public sector has — the prestige and environment of a major institution, including its faculty and physical resources. These attributes were of little import when economic-development programs were built around the seminal strategy of attracting and retaining an industrial base. This was the major urban strategy of the 1950s through the 1970s of most of the cities in the Midwest and the South, while eastern cities were slowly realizing that such a strategy was doomed to fail. The eastern cities, such as Boston, Philadelphia, and New Haven, first suffered the major shift away from manufacturing in the national economy. They came to understand the necessity of a more effective strategy tied to new technology to generate new business. The implementation of this strategy demanded university involvement and opened the doors for mutual discussion among public, private, and university sectors in order to create a nur

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public-Private Partnerships: Improving Urban Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 161

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.