Public-Private Partnerships: Improving Urban Life

By Perry Davis | Go to book overview

The Future of Public-Private Partnerships

WILLIAM S. WOODSIDE

Public-private partnerships have now developed across a wide range of activities. Some involve enormous, multiple-sponsored undertakings, such as the revitalization of an entire downtown area. Others involve much smaller, more time-limited projects with a one-to-one relationship between a private partner and a nonprofit organization. Examples of successful models abound.

"Jobs for Connecticut's Future" is a statewide public-private partnership that seeks to predict the impact of economic and technological change on Connecticut's employment opportunities. The results will help the state's education and training institutions develop programs to meet these projected job requirements.

The 219 community-based Neighborhood Housing Services agencies are another example of successful public-private partnerships. Launched in Pittsburgh in the early 1970s as a local initiative, this model program has been successfully replicated across the nation by the autonomous, federally funded parent, Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation. Today, local NHSs combine Federal, state, and local government investments with those of the private sector to revitalize older and decaying neighborhoods.

The New York City Job and Career Center, which was created by the New York City Partnership, opened 6 June 1986. It draws together corporate leaders, the education community, community service organizations, and government leaders so that young people can explore job opportunities more vigorously and more directly.

In the field of public education, the growth of corporate involvement in all kinds of school-business partnerships is a strong indication of a change in how corporations see themselves in relationship to contemporary society. The rapid proliferation of these school-business partnerships suggests just how far the business world has come in recognizing that it cannot exist as an island, walled off from the community.

____________________
These remarks were presented at "Public Private Partnerships," a conference sponsored by New York City Partnership, Inc., and the Academy of Political Science, New York, New York, 13 June 1986.

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