Governing New York State: The Rockefeller Years

By Robert H. Connery; Gerald Benjamin | Go to book overview

State Aid to Local Government

DONNA E. SHALALA

Characterized in the past as the invisible branch of government—the fallen arch of the federal system—state government has finally arrived. Like a private foundation, the state has enormous funds to give away. New York State allocates over half its money to local governments, resulting in complex fiscal relationships with them. Opinions differ on whether states were pulled or pushed into taking more responsibility for their citizens, but clearly there is much greater involvement today than there was twenty years ago.

Indeed, before New York State became predominantly metropolitan, the level of interdependence was low; citizens demanded few services from their local governments and even fewer from the state. The one exception was New York City, whose vast population concentration made it a special case "which demanded special treatment." 1

Both urbanization (the movement of people from rural areas to the cities) and metropolitanization (the redistribution of population and economic activities between city and suburb) led to increased interdependence between localities and state governments. The growth of the state's aid to localities program is but one reflection of this.

Direct payments to local governments in New York are made through the state's Local Assistance Fund. New York also assists its residents through the State Purposes Fund, which finances services performed by the state, such as the operating expenses of state-maintained institutions. This analysis, however, will focus on the seven

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1
Seymour Sacks, Robert Harris, and John J. Carroll, The Role of State Aid, New York State Department of Audit and Control, Comptroller's Studies in Local Finance, no. 3 (Albany, 1963).

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Governing New York State: The Rockefeller Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Governing New York State: the Rockefeller Years *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors *
  • Preface *
  • Nelson A. Rockefeller as Governor *
  • The Governorship in History *
  • Patterns in New York State Politics *
  • Modernization of the Legislature *
  • The Administration of Justice and Court Reform *
  • The Changing Role of the States in the Federal System *
  • The State and the Federal Government *
  • State Aid to Local Government *
  • The State and the City *
  • Financing the State *
  • Higher Education *
  • The State and Social Welfare *
  • Public Employee Labor Relations under the Taylor Law *
  • Health Care *
  • Housing *
  • Attica and Prison Reform *
  • Public Transportation *
  • Elementary and Secondary Education *
  • Narcotics Addiction: the Politics of Frustration *
  • Environmental Protection *
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