Governing New York State: The Rockefeller Years

By Robert H. Connery; Gerald Benjamin | Go to book overview

Narcotics Addiction:
The Politics of Frustration

ALAN CHARTOCK

The problem of narcotics addiction has evoked proposals for solutions ranging from hard line punishments to the legalization of heroin. That all of these proposals have been taken seriously at various times is some proof that the politics of addiction is a politics of frustration. As official estimates of the number of addicts on the street climb, as related crime continues to increase, as purported solutions fail, the electorate increasingly seeks a definite and final answer to the problem. These demands are fed by shocking revelations—one out of every forty children delivered in New York City hospitals is addicted at birth; addicted mothers sell their children to get money for their habits. The issue is especially compelling in New York State, home for at least half the nation's addict population.

The political fight for resources from the government for the several different types of addiction treatment programs is dramatic testimony to the fact that treatment has become big business. Because of the general ignorance about the subject, each proponent of a cure can muster tremendous political support. Boards of directors, staffed by well-meaning citizens from every walk of life, become proselytizers for their agency's solution.

Each group plays with statistics to support contentions and applies pressure to have its way. Each group seems to make sense because each spots flaws in the others' arguments. The "drug free group," such as Synanon, Daytop, and Odyssey House, propose withdrawal combined with medical treatment and counseling. The "maintenance group" propose use of another drug but one which permits an addict to lead a normal life. The drug free supporters argue that the methadone people

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Governing New York State: The Rockefeller Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Governing New York State: the Rockefeller Years *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors *
  • Preface *
  • Nelson A. Rockefeller as Governor *
  • The Governorship in History *
  • Patterns in New York State Politics *
  • Modernization of the Legislature *
  • The Administration of Justice and Court Reform *
  • The Changing Role of the States in the Federal System *
  • The State and the Federal Government *
  • State Aid to Local Government *
  • The State and the City *
  • Financing the State *
  • Higher Education *
  • The State and Social Welfare *
  • Public Employee Labor Relations under the Taylor Law *
  • Health Care *
  • Housing *
  • Attica and Prison Reform *
  • Public Transportation *
  • Elementary and Secondary Education *
  • Narcotics Addiction: the Politics of Frustration *
  • Environmental Protection *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.