ODYSSEY 2

Dawn's pale rose fingers brushed across the sky,
And Odysseus' son got out of bed and dressed.
He slung his sharp sword around his shoulder,
Then tied oiled leather sandals onto his feet,

And walked out of the bedroom like a god.
5
Wasting no time, he ordered the heralds
To call an assembly. The heralds' cries
Rang out through the town, and the men
Gathered quickly, their long hair streaming.
Telemachus strode along carrying a spear
10
And accompanied by two lean hounds.
Athena shed a silver grace upon him,
And everyone marveled at him as he entered.
The elders made way as he took his father's seat.

First to speak was the hero Aegyptius,
15
A man bowed with age and wise beyond telling.
His son, Antiphus, had gone off to Troy
In the ships with Odysseus (and was killed
In the cave of the Cyclops, who made of him
His last savage meal). Of three remaining sons,
20
One, Eurynomus, ran with the suitors,
And the other two kept their father's farm.
But Aegyptius couldn't stop mourning the one that was lost
And was weeping for him as he spoke out now:

"Hear me now, men of Ithaca.
25
We have never once held assembly or sat
In council since Odysseus left.
15

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Odyssey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Homer - Odyssey *
  • Contents v
  • Introduction xiii
  • Note on the Text lxiv
  • Odyssey 1 1
  • Odyssey 2 *
  • Odyssey 3 28
  • Odyssey 4 44
  • Odyssey 5 70
  • Odyssey 6 85
  • Odyssey 7 95
  • Odyssey 8 106
  • Odyssey 9 125
  • Odyssey 10 141
  • Odyssey 11 158
  • Odyssey 12 178
  • Odyssey 13 192
  • Odyssey 14 206
  • Odyssey 15 222
  • Odyssey 16 240
  • Odyssey 17 256
  • Odyssey 18 276
  • Odyssey 19 290
  • Odyssey 20 309
  • Odyssey 21 322
  • Odyssey 22 336
  • Odyssey 23 353
  • Odyssey 24 365
  • Translator''s Postscript 382
  • Glossary of Names 385
  • Index of Speeches 403
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 412
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