Social Forces in the Making of the New Europe: The Restructuring of European Social Relations in the Global Political Economy

By Andreas Bieler; Adam David Morton | Go to book overview
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Notes on the Contributors

Bastiaan van Apeldoorn is Lecturer in International Relations, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands). His main research interests are the political economy of European integration, processes of transnational capitalist class formation and the globalisation of capital. His work has been published in the Journal of European Public Policy (with Martin Rhodes), the International Journal of Political Economy and in an edited book by Richard Stubbs and Geoffrey Underhill, Political Economy and the Changing Global Order (2000).

Andreas Bieler was formerly Lecturer and Director of Studies in Social and Political Sciences at Newnham and Selwyn College, University of Cambridge, and is now Lecturer in the School of Politics at the University of Nottingham. He is author of Globalisation and Enlargement of the European Union (2000), and co-editor (with Richard Higgott and Geoffrey Underhill) of Non-State Actors and Authority in the Global System (2000).

Hans-Jürgen Bieling is Research Fellow in the Political Science Department at the Philipps University in Marburg. He is currently completing a research project on the dynamics of regime competition in the area of industrial relations within the European Union, which is sponsored by the DFG (German Research Community). He is co-editor (with Frank Deppe) of Arbeitslosigkeit und Wohlfahrtsstaat in Westeuropa. Neun Länder im Vergleich (1997) and author of Dynamiken Sozialer Spaltung und Ausgrenzung: Gesellschaftstheorien und Zeitdiagnosen (2000).

Robert W. Cox is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at York University, Toronto. His early career was in the International Labour Office from which he resigned as an Assistant Director-General in 1972. Before joining the York faculty, he was Professor of International

Organisation at Columbia University, New York (1972–7). His best known books are Production, Power and World Order: Social Forces in the Making of History (1987) and (with Timothy Sinclair) Approaches to World Order (1996). Latterly he has been interested in civilisations and gave the plenary lecture to the December 1999 conference of the British International Studies Association on ‘Thinking About Civilisations’.

-XIV-

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