Roosevelt and Hopkins, An Intimate History

By Robert E. Sherwood | Go to book overview

List of Illustrations
Harry L. Hopkins FRONTISPIECE

The following Photographic illustrations will be found in a group facing page 426

Harry Hopkins before the Senate Commerce Committee, January 13, 1939
Harry Hopkins holds his first press conference, May 21, 1933
Harry Hopkins and Harold Ickes in October, 1935
The Ickes-Hopkins Feud—cartoon
At the New Deal Circus—cartoon
President Roosevelt meets with his Cabinet in September, 1938
Churchill and Hopkins visit Scapa Flow in January, 1941
President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill, Admiral Stark and Admiral King on board the U.S.S. Augusta at the Atlantic Conference
Secretary of State Hull, General Marshall and Ambassador Litvinov greeting Foreign Minister Molotov in Washington in May, 1942
A Sign of Land—cartoon
The Second Front—cartoon
The Churchill-Roosevelt press conference at Casablanca in January, 1943
President Roosevelt studying dispatches during his return trip from Casablanca
The Thanksgiving Day, 1943, meeting in Cairo, Egypt
President Roosevelt awarding the Legion of Merit to General Eisenhower
The arrival of President Roosevelt in the harbor of Malta
President Roosevelt and Foreign Minister Molotov at Yalta
Prime Minister Churchill, President Roosevelt and Premier Stalin at Yalta

-vii-

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