Roosevelt and Hopkins, An Intimate History

By Robert E. Sherwood | Go to book overview

OPERATION CODE NAMES

ABC-1—first American-British outline of grand strategy for the war ( March, 1941).

ANAKIM—code name for land offensive in North Burma to drive out Japanese and reopen Burma Road and an amphibious operation in the south to recapture port of Rangoon.

ANVIL—original code name for landing of American and French forces in the Toulon— Marseilles area of Southern France. Later changed for security reasons to DRAGOON.

AVALANCHE—code name for landings at the Salerno beachhead south of Naples.

BOLERO—code name given to process of building up required U.S. forces and supplies in the British Isles.

BUCCANEER—code name for briefly projected amphibious offensive against the Andaman Islands in Bay of Bengal.

DRAGOON—final code name of French-American landings in Southern France.

FLINTLOCK—code name of attack on Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

GYMNAST, SUPER-GYMNAST—early code names for landings in Algiers and French Morocco.

HUSKY—code name for invasion of Sicily.

JUPITER—code name for suggested landing in Norway.

LIFEBELT—code name for projected operation to seize Azores for use as a base in Battle of the Atlantic and as an airbase for ferrying bombers and transport planes. Aim of operation finally achieved by diplomatic negotiations.

LIGHTFOOT—code name for drive by Generals Alexander and Montgomery from Egypt in October, 1942. Battle of El Alamein marked the beginning of this operation.

MAGNET—code name for movement of first American forces to Northern Ireland.

OVERLORD—final code name for the cross-Channel invasion.

POINTBLANK—code name of combined British-American bombing offensive of German communication and supply lines.

ROUNDUP—code name for major combined cross-Channel offensive against German-dominated Europe, to be mounted in 1943 or later. Later changed to OVERLORD.

SLEDGEHAMMER—1) originally code name for a limited trans-Channel assault in 1942, planned originally as emergency operation in case of imminent collapse of Russian Front or internal German collapse.

2) later used as code name for operation to seize the Cotentin Peninsula to be held as a European bridgehead until ROUNDUP could be mounted.

STRANGLE—code name of combined bombing of German communication and supply lines in Italy.

TORCH—final code name for the North African landings.

VELVET—code name of plan for building up a British-American air force in the Caucasus by end of 1942.

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