Politics in Hungary

By Peter A. Toma; Ivan Volgyes | Go to book overview

Preface

This study is neither a miniature nor an enlargement of the Almond and Powell model of structure-function analysis; because of its "genetic characteristics," it is an approximation of the Almond-Powell comparative politics model presented to us by Eastern European scholar Jan F. Triska of Stanford University.

As explained by participants in a panel on "comparing East European Political Systems" at the 1970 American Political Science Association meeting in Los Angeles, 1 there are at least three methodological problems with the Triska version of the Almond-Powell approach. 2 First, the comparative politics model assumes that each political system develops within specific environmental restrictions. However, we demonstrate in the chapters that follow that the Hungarian political system is not independent of other political systems—especially the USSR and other Warsaw Pact countries. Therefore, it is both difficult and unscientific to clearly differentiate (as the Almond-Powell model would call for) between the Hungarian political culture and that of the other Eastern European socialist cultures in the Soviet bloc. For example, it is inaccurate to equate the Soviet oppression of Hungarian revolutionaries in 1956 with the rule application of the system existing at that time; evidence indicates that the Nagy regime in power in Hungary during the revolution was vehemently opposed to Soviet intervention in November 1956. Similarly, we cannot argue that the 1956 revolution (or counterrevolution) was a manifestation of a conversion function aimed at improving the policy-making process; in our opinion,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics in Hungary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.