Politics in Hungary

By Peter A. Toma; Ivan Volgyes | Go to book overview

12 Conclusions

Nearly thirty years, the life of one generation, have passed since the Communist party took over the reins of power in Hungary. For all these years, the people of Hungary have been living under a socialist system controlled by a single party that has attempted to transform the state from a semi-feudal, underdeveloped country to a nation of intermediate socioeconomic development. The first thirty years of Communist rule have undoubtedly brought about tremendous changes in the life of the country. Today,

Hungary is a people's republic; its social system is socialism. Among the most well-known features of socialism one can count the fact that the means of production are in the hands of the state and thus the exploitation of man by man has ceased to exist. The dictatorship of the proletariat is the dictatorship of the majority, of the working classes over the minority of former oppressors. This classic thesis in its practical functions, however, has been altered considerably as the former ruling class has disappeared. The remainder of the former "exploiters" have found a place in the society and the [new money makers like the] sweater-makers on Kigyo street [in Budapest ] cannot be regarded as exploiters. The [Party's] politics of unity [are] an important step [in] the evolution of an allpeople's state. Today in Hungary there are no bankers . . . ,landlords . . . starving pariahs . . . ,or worker-peasants possessing only one robe. . . . At the same time . . . ,there are trust directors and soccer-players famous throughout Europe, engineer deputy ministers and small shopkeepers . . . ,Party-secretaries and cooperative farm directors, Catholic priests who are active in the People's Front, American businessmen . . . ,and camouflaged prostitutes active . . . around the most famous hotels, girls working at heavy construction and existing in barracks and hovels at Tiszaszederkeny, and students of acting who have just returned from a study tour in France . . . ,workers from the Angyalfold district who own the brand new apartments they live in, and workers from Angyalfold who live in damp base

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics in Hungary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.