The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

ships were, because there also the irruptions of the barbarians were apprehended, and so took leave of their friends, never to return again. After their departure, the Scots and Picts, understanding that they had declared they would come no more, speedily returned, and growing more confident than they had been before, occupied all the northern and farthest part of the island, as far as the wall. Hereupon a timorous guard was placed upon the wall, where they pined away day and night in the utmost fear. On the other side, the enemy attacked them with hooked weapons, by which the cowardly defendants were dragged from the wall, and dashed against the ground. At last, the Britons forsaking their cities and wall, took to flight, and were dispersed. The enemy pursued, and the slaughter was greater than on any former occasion; for the wretched natives were torn in pieces by their enemies, as lambs are torn by wild beasts. Thus being expelled their dwellings and possessions, they saved themselves from starvation, by robbing and plundering one another, adding to the calamities occasioned by foreigners, by their own domestic broils, till the whole country was left destitute of food, except such as could be procured in the chase.


CHAPTER XIII.
IN THE REIGN OF THEODOSIUS, THE YOUNGER, PALLADIUS WAS
SENT TO THE SCOTS THAT BELIEVED IN CHRIST; THE BRITONS
BEGGING ASSISTANCE OF ÆTIUS, THE CONSUL, COULD NOT
OBTAIN IT.

In the year of our Lord 423, Theodosius, the younger, next to Honorius, being the forty-fifth from Augustus, governed the Roman empire twenty-six years. In the eighth year of his reign, Palladius was first sent by Celes

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