The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

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CHAPTER XIX.
HOW THE AFORESAID HONORIUS FIRST, AND AFTERWARDS JOHN,
WROTE LETTERS TO THE NATION OF THE SCOTS, CONCERNING
THE OBSERVANCE OF EASTER, AND THE PELAGIAN HERESY.

The same Pope Honbrius also wrote to the Scots, whom he had found to err in the observance of Easter, as has been' shown above, earnestly exhorting them not to think their small number, placed in the utmost borders of the earth, wiser than all the ancient and modern churches of Christ throughout the world; and not to celebrate a different Easter, contrary to the paschal calculation, and the sytiodical decrees of all the bishops upon earth. Likewise John, who succeeded Severinus, successor to the same Honorius, being yet but pope elect, sent to them letters of great authority and erudition, for correcting the same error; evidently showing, that Easter Sunday is to be found between the fifteenth moon and the twenty-first, as was proved in the Council of Nice. He also in the same epistle admonished them to be careful to crush the Pelagian heresy, which he had been informed was reviving among them. The beginning of the epistle was as follows:—

"To our most beloved and most holy Tomianus, Columbanus, Cromanus, Dimanus, and Baithanus, bishops; to Cromanus, Hernianus, Laustranus, Scellanus; and Segianus, priests; to Saranus and the rest of the Scottish doctors, or abbots, health from Hilarius, the archpriest, and keeper of the place of the holy Apostolic See, John, the deacon, and elect in the name of God; from John, chief secretary and keeper of the place of the holy Apostolic See, and from John, the servant of God, and counsellor of the same Apostolic See. The writings which were brought by the bearers to Pope Severinus, of holy memory,

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