The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

grant me a new term of life, to correct my vicious habits, and totally to reform my mind and course of life in obedience to the Divine will. But I am sensible, that I have no merits of my own to obtain a prolongation of life, nor can I confide in it, unless it shall please God to forgive me, through the assistance of those who have faithfully served him. We have heard, and the report is universal, that there was in your nation a king, of wonderful sanctity, called Oswald, the excellency of whose faith and virtue is become renowned even after his death by the working of miracles. I beseech you, if you have any relics of his in your custody, that you will bring the same to me; in case the Lord shall be pleased, through his merits, to have mercy on me." I answered, "I have indeed some of the stake on which his head was set up by the Pagans, when he was killed, and if you believe, with a sincere heart, the Divine goodness may, through the merit of so great a man, both grant you a longer term of life here, and render you worthy of admittance into eternal life." He answered immediately, "That he had entire faith therein." Then I blessed some water, and put into it a chip of the aforesaid oak, and gave it the sick man to drink. He presently found ease, and recovering of his sickness, lived a long time after, and being entirely converted to God in heart and actions, wherever he came, he spoke of the goodness of his merciful Creator, and the honour of his faithful servant.


CHAPTER XIV.
ON THE DEATH OF PAULINUS, ITHAMAR WAS MADE BISHOP OF
ROCHESTER IN HIS STEAD, OF THE WONDERFUL HUMILITY
OF KING OSWIN, WHO WAS CRUELLY SLAIN BY OSWI.

Oswald being translated to the heavenly kingdom, his brother Oswi, a young man of about thirty years of age, suc

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