The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

be said in its place. For the four brothers we have mentioned, Cedd and Cinebil, Celin and Ceadda, which is a rare thing to be met with, were all celebrated priests of our Lord, and two of them also came to be bishops. When the brethren who were in his monastery, in the province of the East Saxons, heard that the bishop was dead in the province of the Northumbrians, about thirty men of that monastery came thither, being desirous either to live near the body of their father, if it should please God, or to die there and be buried. Being lovingly received by their brethren and fellow-soldiers in Christ, all of them died there by the aforesaid pestilence, except one little boy, who was delivered from death by his father's prayers. For when he had lived there a long time after, and applied himself to the reading of sacred writ, he was informed that he had not been regenerated by the water of baptism, and being then washed in the laver of salvation, he was afterwards promoted to the order of priesthood, and proved very useful to many in the church. I do not doubt that he was delivered at the point of death, as I have said, by the intercession of his father, whilst he was embracing his beloved corpse, that so he might himself avoid eternal death, and by teaching, exhibit the ministry of life and salvation to others of the brethren.


CHAPTER XXIV.
KING PENDA BEING SLAIN, THE MERCIANS RECEIVED THE FAITH
OF CHRIST, AND OSWY GAVE POSSESSIONS AND TERRITORIES TO
GOD, FOR BUILDING MONASTERIES, IN ACKNOWLEDGMENT FOR
THE VICTORY OBTAINED.

At this time, King Oswy was exposed to the cruel and intolerable irruptions of Penda, King of the Mercians,

-171-

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