The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

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Lestingaeu. With him the king also sent his priest Eadhedun, who was afterwards, in the reign of Eegfrid, made bishop of the Church of Hrypum. On arriving in Kent, they found that Archbishop Deusdedit was departed this life, and no other prelate as yet appointed in his place; whereupon they proceeded to the province of the West Saxons, where Wine was bishop, and by him the person above-mentioned was consecrated bishop; two bishops of the British nation, who kept Easter Sunday according to the canonical manner, from the fourteenth to the twentieth day of the moon, as has been said, being taken to assist at the ordination; for at that time there was no other bishop in all Britain canonically ordained, besides that Wine. Ceadd being thus consecrated bishop, began immediately to devote himself to ecclesiastical truth and to chastity; to apply himself to humility, continence, and study; to travel about, not on horseback, but after the manner of the apostles, on foot, to preach the gospel in towns, the open country, cottages, villages, and castles; for he was one of the disciples of Aidan, and endeavoured to instruct his people, by the same actions and behaviour, according to his and his brother Cedd's example. Wilfrid also being made a bishop, coming into Britain, in like manner by his doctrine brought into the English Church many rules of Catholic observance. Whence it followed, that the Catholic institutions daily gained strength, and all the Scots that dwelt in England either conformed to these, or returned into their own country.


CHAPTER XXIX.
HOW THE PRIEST WIGHARD WAS SENT FROM BRITAIN TO ROME, TO
BE CONSECRATED ARCHBISHOP, OF HIS DEATH THERE, AND OF THE
LETTERS OF THE APOSTOLIC POPE GIVING AN ACCOUNT THEREOF.

At this time the most noble King Oswy, of the province of the Northumbrians, and Egbercht of Kent, having con

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