The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

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miracles; for to this day, his horse litter, on which he was wont to be carried when sick, is kept by his disciples, and continues to cure many of agues and other distempers; and not only sick persons who are laid in that litter, or close by it, are cured; but the very chips of it, when carried to the sick, are wont immediately to restore them to health. This man, before he was made bishop, had built two famous monasteries, the one for himself, and the other for his sister Ethilburga, and established them both in regular discipline of the best kind. That for himself was in the county of Surrey, by the river Thames, at a place called Ceortesei, that is, the island of Ceorot; that for his sister in the province of the East Saxons, at the place called Bercingum, wherein she might be a mother and nurse of devout women. Being put into the government of that monastery, she behaved herself in all respects as became the sister of such a brother, living herself regularly, and piously, and orderly, providing for those under her, as was also manifested by heavenly miracles.


CHAPTER VII.
THAT A HEAVENLY LIGHT SHOWED WHERE THE BODIES OF THE
NUNS SHOULD BE BURIED IN THE MONASTERY OF BERKING.

In this monastery many miracles were wrought, which lave been committed to writing by many, from those who knew them, that their memory might be preserved, and following generations edified; some whereof we have also taken care to insert in our "Ecclesiastical History." When the mortality, which we have already so often mentioned, ravaging all about, had also seized on that part of this monastery where the men resided, and they were daily hurried away

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