The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

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peace a short while, she concluded thus: "If it is positively so decreed, and the resolution cannot be altered, I beg that it may be no longer deferred than this next night." Having so said, and being asked by those about her to whom she talked, she said, "With my most dear mother, Ethilburg; by which they understood, that she was come to acquaint her that the time of her departure was at hand: for, as she had desired, after one day and night, she was delivered from the bonds and her infirmity of the flesh, and entered the joys of eternal salvation.


CHAPTER X.
A BLIND WOMAN, PRAYING IN THE BURIAL-PLACE OF THAT
MONASTERY, WAS RESTORED TO HER SIGHT.

Hildelid, devout servant of God, succeeded Ethilburg in the office of abbess, and presided over that monastery many years, till she was of an extreme old age, with exemplary conduct, in the observance of regular discipline, and in the care of providing all things for the public use. The narrownesss of the place where the monastery is built, led her to think that the bones of the male and female servants of Christ, which had been there buried, should be taken up, and translated into the church of the blessed. Mother of God, and interred in one place; whoever wishes to read it, may find in the book from which we have gathered these things, how often a brightness of heavenly light was seen there, and a fragrancy of wonderful odour smelled, and what other miracles wrought. However, I think it by no means fit to pass over the miraculous cure, which the same book informs us was wrought in the church-yard of the said religious house. There lived in that neighbourhood a certain earl, whose wife was seized with a dimness in her eyes,

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