The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

which is everlasting. Thus, after all the provinces of the island of Britain had embraced the faith of Christ, the isle of Wight also received the same; yet being under the affliction of foreign subjection, no man there received the ministry, or rank of a bishop, before Daniel, who is now bishop of the West Saxons. This island is seated opposite to the middle part of the South Saxons and the Gevissæ, being separated from it by a sea, three miles over, which is called Solvente. In this narrow sea, the two tides of the ocean, which flow round Britain from the immense northern ocean, daily meet and oppose one another beyond the mouth of the river Homelea, which runs into that narrow sea, from the lands of the Jutes, which belong to the country of the Gevissæ; after this meeting and struggling together of the two seas, they return into the ocean from whence they come.


CHAPTER XVII.
OF THE SYNOD HELD IN THE PLAIN OF HAETHFELD, WHERE
ARCHBISHOP THEODORE PRESIDED.

About this time, Theodore being informed that the faith of the church at Constantinople was much perplexed by the heresy of Eutyches, and desiring to preserve the churches of the English, over which he presided, from that infection, an assembly of many venerable priests and doctors was convened, at which he diligently inquired into their doctrines, and found they all unanimously agreed in the Catholic faith. This he took care to have committed to writing by the authority of the synod, as a memorial, and for the instruction of succeeding generations; the beginning of which instrument is as follows:—

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