The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

place also as abbot; for from ancient times, the bishop was wont to reside there with. his clergy, and the abbot with his monks, who were likewise under the care of the bishop; because Aidan, who was the first bishop of the place, being himself a monk, brought monks thither, and settled the monastic institution there; as the blessed Father Augustine is known to have done before in Kent, the most reverend Pope Gregory writing to him, as has been said above, to this effect:—"But since, my brother, having been instructed in monastic rules; you must not live apart from your clergy in the church of the English, which has been lately, through the help of God, converted to the faith; you must, therefore, establish that course of life, which was among our ancestors in the primitivie church, among whom, none called any thing that he possessed his own; but all things were in common to them."


CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE SAME ST. CUTHBERT, BEING AN ANCHORITE, BY HIS PRAYERS
OBTAINED A SPRING IN A DRY SOIL, AND HAD A CROP FROM
SEED SOWN BY HIMSELF OUT OF SEASON.

Cuthbert, afterwards advancing in his meritorious and devout intentions, proceeded even to the observance of silence according to the hermit's life. But forasmuch as we several years ago wrote enough of his life and virtues, both in heroic verse and prose, it may suffice at present only to mention this, that when he was about to repair to the island, he made this protestation to the brothers, saying, "If it shall please the Divine goodness to grant me, that I may live in that place by the labour of my hands, I will willingly reside there; but if not, I will, by God's permission, very soon return to you." The place was quite

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