The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

house, perceived her countenance more cheerful, and like one in perfect health. Having seated myself down by her, she said, "Would you like me to call for something to drink?" "Yes," said I, "and am very glad if you can." When the cup was brought, and we had both drunk, she said, "As soon as the bishop had said the prayer, given me his blessing, and gone out, I immediately began to mend; and though I have not yet recovered my former strength, yet all the pain is quite gone from my arm, where it was most intense, and from all my body, as if the bishop had carried it away with him; though the swelling of the arm still seems to remain." When we departed from thence, the cure of the pain in her limbs was followed by the assuaging of the swelling; and, the virgin being thus delivered from torture and death, returned praise to our Lord and Saviour, with his other servants who were there.


CHAPTER IV.
THE SAME BISHOP HEALED AN EARL'S WIFE THAT WAS SICK,
WITH HOLY WATER.

The same abbot related another miracle, not unlike the former, of the aforesaid bishop. Not very far from our monastery, that is, about two miles off, was the country-house of one Puch, an earl, whose wife had languished near forty days under a very acute disease, insomuch that for three weeks she could not be carried out of the room where she lay. It happened that the man of God was, at that time, invited thither by the earl to consecrate a church; and when that was done, the earl desired him to dine at his house. The bishop declined, saying, "He must return to the monastery, which was very near." The earl pressing him more earnestly, vowed he would also give alms to the

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