The Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation

By Bede | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII.
OF ONE AMONG THE NORTHUMBRIANS, WHO ROSE FROM THE DEAD,
AND RELATED THE THINGS WHICH HE HAD SEEN, SOME EXCITING
TERROR, OTHERS DELIGHT.

At this time a memorable miracle, and like to those of former days, was wrought in Britain; for, to the end that the living might be saved from the death of the soul, a certain person, who had been some time dead, rose again to life, and related many remarkable things he had seen; some of which I have thought fit here briefly to take notice of. There was a master of a family in that district of the Northumbrians, which is called Cuningham, who led a religious life, as did also all that belonged to him. This man fell sick, and his distemper daily increasing, being brought to extremity, he died in the beginning of the night; but in the morning early, he suddenly came to life again, and sat up, upon which all those that sat about the body weeping, fled away in a great fright, only his wife, who loved him best, though in a great consternation and trembling, remained with him. He, comforting her, said, "Fear not, for I am now truly risen from death, and permitted again to live among men; however, I am not to live hereafter as I was wont, but from henceforward after a very different manner." Then rising immediately, he repaired to the oratory of the little town, and continuing in prayer till day, immediately divided all his substance into three parts; one whereof he gave to his wife, another to his children, and the third belonging to himself, he instantly distributed among the poor. Not long after he repaired to the monastery of Mailros, which is almost enclosed by the winding of the river Twede, and having been shaven, went into a private dwelling, which the abbot had provided, where he continued till the day of his death, in such extraordinary con

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