The Language of the Civil War

By John D. Wright | Go to book overview

U

U.H. Grant. See Grant, U.H.

Uncle A male slave, usually elderly. It was used with his first name, such as Uncle Joe.

Uncle Abe or Uncle Abraham Affectionate nicknames for President Abraham Lincoln. During his second presidential race in 1864, a popular book of quotations was Lincolniana; or, The Humors of Uncle Abe.

Uncle Billy A personal nickname given by his soldiers to Union Major General W.T.Sherman. He liked the name and continued to use it himself after the war, as in his speech on August 11, 1880, to Union veterans, in which he said “every soldier here today knows that Uncle Billy loves him as his own flesh and blood.” The men also called him “Old Billy” or just “Billy.” See also Billy.

Uncle Dick The nickname for Union Major General Richard J.Oglesby. He had been in the Mexican War and California Gold Rush before joining the Union army to lead divisions of the Army of the Tennessee. In 1862, he was wounded at Corinth, Mississippi. Oglesby, who was noted for his pleasant personality and keen wit, was later elected governor of Illinois and then a U.S.Senator.

Uncle George The nickname for Union Major General George Crook. He fought at Antietam in 1862 and in campaigns in Tennessee and the Shenandoah. Captured in 1865 in Maryland, he was later exchanged and commanded the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac. Four years before the war, Crook had survived a poisoned arrow taken while fighting Indians; he returned to Indian fighting after the war and achieved more success than any other former Union soldier, including George Armstrong Custer. The Indians called him “Gray Fox.”

Uncle Gideon A nickname for Gideon Welles, President Abraham Lincoln’s secretary of the navy, who took the office at the age of 60. A former Democrat, Gideon had previously published the Hartford Times of Connecticut, and Lincoln enjoyed teasing him for not knowing a ship’s bow from its stern. See also “Father Neptune.”

Uncle Joe An affectionate nickname for Confederate General Joseph E.Johnston. See “The Yellow Rose of Texas.”

-308-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Language of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Guide to Related Topics xv
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 50
  • D 81
  • E 100
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 138
  • I 154
  • J 161
  • K 166
  • L 172
  • M 184
  • N 202
  • O 208
  • P 221
  • Q 242
  • R 245
  • S 259
  • T 293
  • U 308
  • V 314
  • W 318
  • Y 329
  • Z 332
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 337
  • About the Author 378
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 379

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.