The Language of the Civil War

By John D. Wright | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The following volumes were indispensable in providing Civil War terms and examples, and they are recommended to those pursing further reading for research or enrichment.

Allen, Thomas B. We Americans. Washington, DC: National Geographic Society, 1975.

Arnold, James R. The Armies of U.S. Grant. London: Arms and Armour Press, 1995.

Beckett, Ian F.W. The War Correspondents: The American Civil War. London: Grange Books, 1997.

Billings, John. Hardtack and Coffee. Boston: George M.Smith, 1887.

Boatner, Mark M., III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York: Vintage Books, 1991.

Bode, Carl. Midcentury America. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1972.

Bradley, William J. The Civil War. New York: Military Press, 1990.

Butcher, Margaret J. The Negro in American Culture. New York: New American Library, 1957.

Chapman, Robert L. The Dictionary of American Slang. New York: Harper & Row, 1987.

Craven, Avery, ed. “To Markie.” Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1933.

Dannett, Sylvia G.L. Noble Women of the North. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1959.

Davis, Burke. The Civil War: Strange & Fascinating Facts. New York: The Fairfax Press, 1982.

Davis, Kenneth C. Don’t Know Much About the Civil War. New York: Avon Books, 1996.

Davis, William C. Battlefields of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 1991.

——. Brothers in Arms. New York: Smithmark, 1995.

——. The Commanders of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 1990.

——. The Fighting Men of the Civil War. London: Salamander Books, 1989.

Dickson, Paul. War Slang. New York: Pocket Books , 1994.

Foote, Shelby. The Civil War: A Narrative, Vol. 1, Fort Sumter to Perryville. New York: Random House, 1958; Vol. 2, Fredericksburg to Meridian. New York: Random House, 1963; Vol. 3, Red River to Appomattox. New York: Random House, 1974.

Garrison, Webb. 2,000 Questions and Answers About the Civil War. New York: Gramercy Books, 1992.

Girard, Charles. A Visit to the Confederate States of America in 1863. Tuscaloosa, AL: Confederate Publishing Company, 1962.

Gragg, Rod. The Civil War Quiz and Fact Book. New York: Harper & Row, 1985.

Grant, U.S. Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. New York: Smithmark, 1994.

Green, Jonathon. The Cassell Dictionary of Slang. London: Cassell, 1998.

Hart, Albert B. The Romance of the Civil War. New York: Macmillan, 1903.

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The Language of the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Guide to Related Topics xv
  • A 1
  • B 19
  • C 50
  • D 81
  • E 100
  • F 107
  • G 122
  • H 138
  • I 154
  • J 161
  • K 166
  • L 172
  • M 184
  • N 202
  • O 208
  • P 221
  • Q 242
  • R 245
  • S 259
  • T 293
  • U 308
  • V 314
  • W 318
  • Y 329
  • Z 332
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 337
  • About the Author 378
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