Notes
1
Singimg is a Tok Pisin term that refers to a gathering for the performance of (usually) traditional music, and is generally village based.
2
Papua New Guinea is divided into nineteen provinces for political and administrative purposes.
3
Standard here refers to the most common tuning of the guitar - the notes EADGBE from sixth to first strings respectively (perfect fourth intervals between all strings except for a major third interval between the third and second strings).
4
In the music I recorded the strings of the guitar were tuned to the notes D, E, A, E, A, C#, from sixth to first strings respectively.
5
catenating words by removing the vowels and referring to the acronym-like result is common throughout PNG. Irupara, a neighbouring village is often referred to as IRP (each letter pronounced as in an acronym) or IRPR. ‘BBK’ is therefore commonly used to refer to Babaka village. This has been extended in Babaka to BB Kings, and sporting teams are commonly known by this in sport competitions outside the village, such as local area tournaments or those in Port Moresby.

References

Feld, S. (1988)‘Aesthetics as Iconicity of Style, or‘Lift-up-over-Sounding’: Getting into the Kaluli groove’, Yearbook for Traditional Music 20: 74–113. (1994)‘From schizophonia to schismogenesis: on the discourses and

commodification practices of “world music” and “world beat’”, in C. Keil and S. Feld (eds), Music Grooves, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press

Hall, S. (1991)‘The Local and the Global: Globalization and ethnicity’, in A. King (ed.), Culture, Globalization and the World System: Contemporary conditions for the representation of identity, New York: Macmillan

Hesmondhalgh, D. (1998)‘Globalisation and Cultural Imperialism: A case study of the music industry’, in R. Kiely and P. Marfleet (eds), Globalisation and the Third World, London: Routledge

Kemoi, N. (1996), ‘The History of the Bamboo Band in Bougainville’, Kulele: Occasional papers on Pacific music and dance, No. 2, Port Moresby: National Research Institute.

Lindstrom, L and White, G. (1990), Island Encounters: Black and white memories of the Pacific War, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

McLean, M. (1994), ‘Diffusion of Musical Instruments and Their Relation to Language Migrations in New Guinea’, Kulele: Occasional papers on Pacific music and dance, No.l, Port Moresby: National Research Institute.

-154-

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Guitar Cultures
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Notes on Contributors ix
  • 1 - Introduction: Guitars, Cultures, People and Places 1
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 2 - The Guitar in the Blues Music of the Deep South 11
  • Notes 25
  • References *
  • 3 - Unplugged: Blues Guitarists and the Myth of Acousticity 27
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 4 - ‘plug in and Play!’ Uk‘indie-Guitar’ Culture 45
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 5 - Handmade in Spain: the Culture of Guitar Making 63
  • Notes 82
  • References *
  • 6 - The Guitar as Artifact and Icon: Identity Formation in the Babyboom Generation 89
  • Notes 113
  • References *
  • 7 - Into the Arena: Edward Van Halen and the Cultural Contradictions of the Guitar Hero 117
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 7 - The Guitar Cultures of Papua New Guinea: Regional, Social and Stylistic Diversity 135
  • Notes 154
  • References *
  • 9 - Hybridity and Segragation in the Guitar Cultures of Brazil 157
  • Notes 174
  • References *
  • 10 - Rock to Raga: the Many Lives of the Indian Guitar 179
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Index 209
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