The Life of Matthew Flinders

By Miriam Estensen | Go to book overview

THE LIFE OF
MATTHEW FLINDERS

Miriam Estensen

ALLEN & UNWIN

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The Life of Matthew Flinders
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Conversions xii
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Glossary xv
  • 1 - From the Fens to the Sea 1
  • 2 - The Voyage with Bligh 10
  • 3 - War 28
  • 4 - The Colony of New South Wales 39
  • 5 - The Tom Thumb Adventures 52
  • 6 - ‘no Ship Ever Went to Sea So Much Lumber'd’ 62
  • 7 - Van Diemen's Land— an Island? 68
  • 8 - Colonial Affairs 81
  • 9 - ‘sea, I Am Thy Servant’ 86
  • 10 - North on the East Coast, 1799 94
  • 11 - ‘if Adverse Fortune Does Not Oppose Me, I Will Succeed’ 108
  • 12 - Enlightenment and Exploration 120
  • 13 - ‘a Ship is Fitting out for Me’ 133
  • 14 - A Possibility of Marriage 149
  • 15 - The Voyage out 167
  • 16 - Terra Australis 177
  • 17 - Tragedy at No 12 Inlet 189
  • 18 - Encounter Bay 198
  • 19 - Sydney—1802 210
  • 20 - The Circumnavigation Begins 225
  • 21 - The Strait and the Gulf 241
  • 22 - Diverse Encounters 259
  • 23 - The Journey Back 268
  • 24 - The Porpoise 279
  • 25 - Shipwreck 292
  • 26 - Mauritius 312
  • 27 - Detention 319
  • 28 - The Garden Prison 333
  • 29 - Letters 349
  • 30 - Wilhems Plains 363
  • 31 - ‘they Have Forgotten Me’ 384
  • 32 - Intimations of Freedom 399
  • 33 - ‘six Years, Five Months and Twenty-Seven Days’ 412
  • 34 - The Return 422
  • 35 - A Voyage to Terra Australis 441
  • 36 - The Final Years 461
  • 37 - Matthew Flinders—conclusion 476
  • Endnotes 482
  • Bibliography 505
  • Index 514
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