Australian Urban Planning: New Challenges, New Agendas

By Brendan Gleeson; Nicholas Low | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book is the result of much discussion and debate going back many years. More influences have come to bear on it than can be adequately acknowledged. Some indication can be gained from the length of the Bibliography. Still, here we want to mention a few. We have dedicated the book to the memory of Peter Self and Ruth Crow, who both died in 1999. Peter was always a mentor, full of wisdom and common sense and a passionate commitment to good governance, and Ruth, with her partner Maurie, made an enduring contribution to planning thought and practice of the kind we would like to promote.

Patrick Troy has made so many contributions to Australian planning, personally, through his work, and through one institution he helped to create: the Urban Research Program at the Australian National University (now the Urban and Environmental Program). His remarkable and unique contribution is to make possible an Australian perspective and vision of planning. We also want to acknowledge Ruth Fincher, Brian McLoughlin, Max Neutze, Leonie Sandercock, Frank Stilwell, Paul Mees, Rob Freestone, Bruce Moon and Ed Wensing, to whose work and advice we often turned; and, in the field of political science and public administration, Anne Capling, Mark Considine, Michael Crozier, Martin Laffin, Martin Painter and John Paterson.

Two institutions especially helped us. The Urban and Environmental Research Program at the Australian National University provided an intellectual home for both authors. Brendan Gleeson was a member of the program between 1996 and 1999 and benefited enormously from interaction with the other program members. The program hosted a conference in 1998 on ‘Renewing Australian Planning’ which stimulated much thought. Nicholas Low spent four months as sabbatical

-viii-

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