Protecting Psychiatric Patients and Others from the Assisted-Suicide Movement: Insights and Strategies

By Barbara A. Olevitch | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to acknowledge with gratitude two individuals whose work provided the foundation for my thinking, and whom I have had the privilege to meet. I would like to thank Albert Ellis for developing his method of psychotherapy, and for communicating it so well in his workshops. His work has offered me much clarification about psychological misery and how to ease it. I would also like to thank Wesley J. Smith, whose clear vision of the ideas about death that are circulating in our society, and the effects of these ideas upon health care in America, gave me so much understanding, and whose writing style was an inspiration. I would like to thank Albert Ellis and N. Gregory Hamilton for writing the forewords for this book.

I would also like to thank those pioneers in the field—Herbert Hendin and Rita Marker—whose documentation of the problems of the assisted-suicide movement and whose insights are essential to everyone interested in this area.

I would also like to thank Rita Marker and the International Anti-Euthanasia Task Force for creating and maintaining their web site (www.internationaltaskforce.org) from which I obtained much valuable information andinspiration.Special thanks to Wesley J. Smith and Kathi Hamlon for answering my questions.

I would like to thank Mary Johnson and the staff of the library at the Missouri Institute of Mental Health for helping me so many times, and the staff of numerous other libraries—Olin Library, Bernard Becker Medical Library, and the Law Library at Washington University, the St. Louis County Library, University City Public Library, and the St. Louis Public Library—who helped me find pertinent materials.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Protecting Psychiatric Patients and Others from the Assisted-Suicide Movement: Insights and Strategies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 204

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.