Protecting Psychiatric Patients and Others from the Assisted-Suicide Movement: Insights and Strategies

By Barbara A. Olevitch | Go to book overview

good health services and support services in a less stressful manner. We have to insist that the current, insensitive way of treating sick people, combined with a new strategy of allowing physician-assisted suicide, will inevitably lead to all kinds of psychological problems and all kinds of unnecessary suicides. To provide justification for these unnecessary suicides in the form of a psychological report would be a complete abandonment of our treasured goal of a society organized in such a way as to maximize the psychological functioning of all of its members.


REFERENCES

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Barnett, E.H. (1999, Oct. 17). Is Mom capable of choosing to die? Oregonian, G1, G2.

Block, S.D., & Billings, J.A. (1995). Patient requests for euthanasia and assisted suicide in terminal illness: The role of the psychiatrist. Psychosomatics, 36, 445–457.

Cassell, E.J., Leon, A.C., & Kaufman, S.G. (2001). Preliminary evidence of impaired thinking in sick patients. Annals of Internal Medicine, 134, 1120–1123.

Death with Dignity Act, Oregon Revised Statutes, Section 127.800–127.897 (1998).

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., DSM IV. (1994). Washington D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.

Emmanuel, L.L. (1998). Facing requests for physician-assisted suicide: Toward a practical and principled clinical skill set. Journal of the American Medical Association, 280, 643–647.

Fenn, D.S., & Ganzini, L. (1999). Attitudes of Oregon psychologists toward physicianassisted suicide and the Oregon Death with Dignity Act. ProfessionalPsychology: Research and Practice, 30, 235–244.

Ganzini, L., & Lee, M.A. (1997). Psychiatry and assisted suicide in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine, 336, 1824–1826.

Hamilton, N.G., & Hamilton, C.A. (1999, Spring). Therapeutic response to assisted suicide request. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 63(2), 191–201.

Hendin, H. (1997). Seduced by death: Doctors, patients, and the Dutch cure. New York: W.W. Norton.

Kettler, B. (2000, Jun. 25). A death in the family: “We knew she would do it.” Sunday Mail Tribune (Medford, OR), pp. 1A, 8A.

Moscicki, E.K. (1999). Epidemiology of suicide. In D.G. Jacobs (Ed.), The Harvard Medical School guide to suicide assessment and intervention. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, pp. 40–51.

Oregon’s 3rd annual assisted suicide report: More of the same. (2001). Update, International Task Force on Euthanasia & Assisted Suicide, 15 (1), 2.

Physicians for Compassionate Care. (2000, Apr. 25). Pain Relief Promotion Act (HR2260): Written testimony of Physicians for Compassionate Care to United States Senate Judiciary Committee.

Robins, E., Murphy, G.E., Wilkinson, R.H., Gassner, S., & Kayes, J. (1959). Some clinical considerations in the prevention of suicide based on a study of 134 successful suicides. American Journal of Public Health and the Nation’s Health, 49(7), 888–899.

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