Protecting Psychiatric Patients and Others from the Assisted-Suicide Movement: Insights and Strategies

By Barbara A. Olevitch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8

Insuring the Integrity of Informed Consent

Medical treatment involves very difficult experiences that most people do not wish to undergo. Doctors ordinarily avoid treating their own relatives and children because they may be swayed by the anticipated suffering into making the wrong decision. Just as it is hard to make a decision to put a relative into a painful situation, it is even harder to make this decision regarding yourself. The anticipated pain can override all the other considerations and short-circuit the decision-making process. In today’s managed care environment, time to counsel the patient is often not available. The patient’s decision may be guided by his irrational fears rather than by good information.

Highly skilled health counseling, liaison work, and emotional support is unfortunately necessary to get many people to do the difficult, scary things that they have to do to save their lives.

Massad (2000) wrote a touching piece in the Journal of the American Medical Association about his efforts to treat a woman’s cancer. The patient “did not seem relieved” when he explained that her cancer was small and that she had an “excellent chance for cure.” Instead, she just “shook” while he explained “treatment options” and cried when he asked for a decision. He told her to think it over and come back in a few days, but she failed to return. She “would not come to the telephone” when he called. Her daughter explained that her mother’s friends had convinced her that cancer treatment just increases suffering. So she didn’t return for immediate followup, as she was supposed to. Instead she simply waited until “her pain began to gnaw at her more intensely than her fear” and

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Protecting Psychiatric Patients and Others from the Assisted-Suicide Movement: Insights and Strategies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 204

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.