Self-Defense and Battered Women Who Kill: A New Framework

By Robbin S. Ogle; Susan Jacobs | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

The Law of Self-Defense and the Battered Woman

In this chapter, we explore the law of self-defense. As an initial matter, it is good to be reminded that there is not a single “law of self-defense.” Each state recognizes the defense, but our federalist system allows each to define and understand it differently. Given the variety, indeed the discrepancy, of understandings, it is difficult to draw meaningful generalizations. Therefore, we have chosen to organize these materials by broad substantive topics, discussing the general nature of self-defense and then illustrating and critiquing, where appropriate, some of its dominant variations. We have chosen this approach because it makes little sense to suggest that counsel in any given case will set out to use that case to change the law; counsel is required to represent her client within the bounds of the law and to work with the law as it is in the jurisdiction. Virtually no lawyer would ignore the law of the jurisdiction in favor of sacrificing the client toward the end of modifying some legal standard. At most, if defense of the client fails, an appellate court may be persuaded to modify legal understandings. But for the most part, real change in the law comes from the legislature and those changes are slow to be realized.

In these materials, then, we take the law as it is and find that, in some important respects, it is evolving fairly well; that is, some important concepts defining self-defense are becoming more broadly understood, hence the defense is not as narrowly available as it once was. Beyond that, we discover that changes in the rules of evidence governing the admission of ex-

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Self-Defense and Battered Women Who Kill: A New Framework
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 213

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.